The importance of being clean!

keep it simple!  

Imagine your desk partner has a cold, and he sneezes on your hand while you are working together. You wash your hands as soon as possible so you will be less likely to become sick also.

One personal benefit of good hygiene is having better health. Keeping your body clean helps prevent illness and infection from bacteria or viruses. Like in our example, the simple act of washing your hands regularly is an effective way to keep germs from spreading. You would be much more likely to get sick if, instead of washing your hands, you wiped them off on your pants and went to lunch as soon as class was over.

Maintaining good hygiene also helps you have better self-esteem. In other words, when you take care of how you look, you feel better about yourself. When you don't take care of your personal hygiene, it can also make you feel less confident and unmotivated. Unfortunately, when a person is depressed or has low self-esteem, they are more likely to neglect their personal hygiene. Have you ever had someone tell you to get up and take a shower and you would feel better? It is definitely worth a try because it just might work!

How Long Does It Take To Lose Muscle After A Layoff?

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Your training program also impacts how quickly you detrain and lose muscle. Endurance athletes may experience muscle atrophy slower in part because their muscles are leaner and predominantly slow-twitched muscle fibers compared to power athletes, who predominantly have fast-twitch muscle fibers. For example, the book “Sports-Specific Rehabilitation” reports that endurance athletes such as rowers took up to 12 weeks to lose muscle mass and slow-twitched muscle fibers. On the other hand, power lifters, competitive weightlifters and football players can lose muscle strength as early as two weeks with inactivity.

Muscle loss with an increase of fat in the muscle, also known as sarcopenia, is a common aging process. Because this occurs, the elderly may experience quicker muscle loss or more muscle loss during inactivity compared to younger individuals. A 2009 University of Queensland study found that elderly men and women experienced an increase in sarcopenia after 24 weeks of inactivity. Unlike age, gender has not been shown to influence the rate of muscle loss with detraining.